B.C. Health Official Warns Homeopathy for Autism Is ‘Certainly Not Based on Science’

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Health officials have stated that homeopathic treatment has “huge potential harms.” Many registered B.C. naturopaths are the subjects of a complaint for the “complete elimination of autism spectrum expression” therapy (CEASE) offered in B.C.

Dr. Bonnie Henry is a provincial health officer concerned about CEASE, saying that:

“It’s certainly not based on science. It’s based on a belief system. My big concern is that it really misleads parents into believing that immunizations are a cause of their child’s autism.”

CEASE Based on Unfounded Claims – Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism

The CEASE therapy claims that 70% of autism is caused by vaccines, 25% by medications and other substances, and 5% by disease.

Practitioners that offer the CEASE remedies by diluting vaccines and offering vitamins to “detoxify” children with autism.

The studies that proved there is a link between autism and vaccines were debunked, said Henry. Nonetheless, naturopaths that offer CEASE therapy will only create “a level of fear around immunizations that is just not warranted, and it is very difficult to help people get over those fears.”

Homeopaths Have No Right to Say Vaccines Cause Autism

Laura Heinze, the spokesperson of the ministry of health, added that naturopaths have no right of advertising elimination of autism through homeopathy or to suggest that vaccines are the ones causing autism:

“The ministry expects all colleges and regulators to protect the public from misleading claims.”

B.C. Naturopaths like Anke Zimmermann, Janice Potter, and Margret Holland are CEASE practitioners, all certified to offer the therapy, but there are many complaints against them. However, they are not the only homeopaths or natural healers to advertise this treatment.

The last complaint against Zimmermann was when she used a remedy made from rabid dog saliva on a little boy.

Henry said that parents must be aware that immunization is vital in protecting children from diseases.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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