A New Big Bang to End our Lives in Seconds – All with the Help of The Higgs Boson?

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Our universe may end with a similar way it was made: with a major, sudden blast

That is as indicated by new research from a team of Harvard physicists, who found that the destabilization of the Higgs boson, a small quantum molecule that gives different particles mass, could prompt a blast of energy that would devour everything in the known universe and overturn the laws of physics and chemistry.

As a component of their investigation, published a month ago in the journal Physical Review D, the analysts computed when our universe could end.

It’s nothing to stress over right now

They settled out on the date of 10139, a long time from now, or 10 million trillion, trillion, many many trillion years later.

Furthermore, they’re no less than 95% beyond any doubt, a factual measure of conviction, that the universe will last at any rate an additional 1058 years.

The Higgs boson, found in 2012 by specialists crushing subatomic protons together at the Large Hadron Collider, has a particular mass.

On the off chance that the specialists are right, that mass could change, turning physics on its head and tear separated the components that make life conceivable, as indicated by the New York Post.

Another Big Bang?

What’s more, as opposed to consuming gradually more than trillions of years, a flimsy Higgs boson could make a momentary blast, similar to the Big Bang that made our universe.

The specialists say that a collapse could be driven by the shape of space-time around a black hole, someplace somewhere down in the universe.

At the point when space-time bends around super-thick objects, similar to a black hole, it tosses the laws of physics lopsided and makes particles communicate in a wide range of bizarre ways.

The specialists say the collapse may have just started, yet we have no chance to get off knowing, as the Higgs boson molecule might be far from where we can break down it, inside our apparently unbounded universe.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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