San Diego immigration sweep sees more than 100 arrested

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san diego immigration sweep

More than 100 undocumented immigrants were detained by immigration officers during a three-day operation that spanned San Diego and Imperial counties, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials said on Thursday.

ICE said the raids that ended on Thursday resulted in the arrest of 115 people who were violating federal immigration laws. Of those, 108 were arrested in San Diego County.

50 of the people arrested had convictions for crimes, according to ICE, while at least seven were arrested for re-entering the United States after being deported by order of the judge.

On Thursday, Telemundo 20 reported on the increase in immigration raids that had been witnessed in the north of the county.

“This week’s operation focused on threats such as those of convicted criminals from other countries, individuals with deportation orders, people who had entered the country illegally after being deported, and individuals who otherwise violated the This country’s immigration laws, “said Greg Archambeault, director of the ICE Detention and Deportation Office in San Diego.

It was not clear where the raids took place in San Diego County, but at least two arrests were made in Oceanside, including the arrest of a suspected 43-year-old center street gang member from Mexico who had been deported four times and a man 55 year old citizen of Kazakhstan sought by his country for tax evasion.

Detainees who re-entered the United States after deportation or who have pending orders for expulsion will be deported immediately. Others will remain in ICE custody pending a hearing before an immigration judge, ICE said in a press release.

Detainees who re-entered the United States after deportation or who have pending orders for expulsion will be deported immediately. Others will remain in ICE custody pending a hearing before an immigration judge, ICE said in a press release.

In a statement released on Thursday, ICE criticized California’s “sanctuary status” and said the designation increases the number of “collateral arrests.”

“California state laws require ICE to concentrate additional resources to carry out mass arrests in the community, putting officers, the general public and foreigners at greater risk and increasing incidents of collateral arrests,” the statement said. .

A lawsuit filed by Attorney General Jeff Session against the state of California makes the same claim.

The governor of California, Jerry Brown, signed the state sanctuary legislation last October that prohibited the police from asking people about their immigration status or participating in federal enforcement activities.

California laws were passed in response to Trump’s pledges to drastically intensify the deportation of undocumented people living in the United States. and that went into effect on January 1.

“These are uncertain times for undocumented Californians and their families, and this bill strikes a balance that will protect public safety, while offering a measure of well-being for those families who live in fear every day,” Brown said. a statement.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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