Man Gets Vasectomy 2 Years Ago and Gets His Wife Pregnant

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Meet Tully Hughes, the youngest boy of a Canadian family. He was quite a surprise to Dianne and Bobby because the father had a vasectomy two years before his wife got pregnant.

Vasectomies are done exactly to keep a man from having children, but sometimes, the vessels that get cut by the surgeons can reattach in time. This is what happened to Bobby too.

Dianne Mallard said that they didn’t know that the vasectomy would reverse: “We have no idea. But after talking to some people I guess this does happen.” And the husband is sure this was a sign, saying that “I knew if there was a family that it should happen to, it’s ours.”

The Family Gets Another Surprise

Tully Huges, the surprise baby, was set on surprising his parents once again when he arrived eight weeks earlier than normal.

Unfortunately, the pregnancy was difficult. When Dianne was in her 20 weeks’ pregnancy, doctors diagnosed her after an ultrasound with a complete placenta previa. That meant that her placenta was over her cervix. She had to stay in bed for the rest of the pregnancy.

At 28 weeks she started bleeding and she was immediately airlifted to Halifax, at the IWK children’s and maternity hospital. Four weeks later, at 32 weeks of pregnancy, Dianne was scheduled to be flown back to Charlottetown and stay at the QEH.

But that morning she lost three liters of blood, so she had an emergency C-section.

The father was announced to immediately go to the IWK. He said he “didn’t know what was going on.”

On his way to Halifax, Huges had no idea that Tully wanted to hurry up. He was weighing four pounds, and four ounces. The baby started crying and Dianne knew he was alive and well, so her question was:

“Am I going to be OK?”

She was still bleeding because the placenta was grown too deep into the uterine walls. She needed a blood transfusion and the doctor performed a hysterectomy. Then the bleeding stopped and she was ready to get another blood transfusion.

Hughes arrived at the hospital and said that he “had no idea what I was walking into”.

His wife was heavy on drugs and his newborn son was in the neonatal intensive care unit at the QEH.

At home, Tully will be greeted by his two big sisters and two big brothers. So far, they’re still under medical attention until Tully grows stronger. His mother is sure that “he’s going to do big things.” And she also said that he’d better “be prime minister someday or something.”

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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