Cardiac Defects in Babies Tied To Post-Pregnancy Cardiovascular Disease in Their Mothers

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Mothers that gave birth to babies with congenital heart defects could have a risk of heart problems later in life. They could have a heart attack or heart failure, warns a recent study.

The research has been recently published in the journal Circulation. Researchers analyzed data on over one million women who delivered babies between 1989 and 2013 in Quebec, Canada. They found out that, compared to mothers that delivered infants without congenital heart defects, the ones that delivered babies with heart defects had 43% higher risks of being hospitalized due to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers tracked data from women for 25 years since pregnancy and looked for any hospitalization related to heart attacks, heart failure, atherosclerotic disorders and heart transplants.

Psychosocial and Financial Stress Are Also Factors that Cause Heart Diseases

The lead author of the study, Nathalie Auger, with the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, Quebec said the following:

“Caring for infants with critical heart defects is associated with psychosocial and financial stress, which may increase the mothers’ long-term risk for cardiovascular disease.”

The effects of the stress caused by financial and social issues will increase the genetic component that can cause heart disease after a period of time. The study suggests that because 85% of the infants with heart defects survive adolescence, mothers are more likely to be psychologically affected by the situation.

The Aim of the Study Is To Raise Awareness: Mothers Need Help

Mothers can benefit from this study, because they can seek help, like counseling and prevention strategies. This way, the risk of cardiovascular diseases for women can be decreased.

Nathalie Auger suggested mothers should seek help from healthcare providers that treat and care for them when they are in early stages of managing children with heart disease. This way, mothers will understand they also risk heart disease and they should minimize the risk.

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Andre Blair s is the lead editor for Advocator.ca. He holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Toronto, and a Master of Science in Public Health (M.S.P.H.) from the School of Public Health, Department of Health Administration, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Andre specializes in environmental health, but writes on a variety of issues.


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