Siamese Twinss Connected At The Head Separated in India

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after more than 36 hours of surgery and forty surgeon, a hospital in India successfuly separated two Siamese twins attached to the head.

The two-year-old boys were born in a village in the Odisha, connected to the head by blood vessels and brain tissue, a rare malformation that occurs in only one in 2.5 million births.

They were operated on at a public hospital in New Delhi on Wednesday after a preparatory procedure in August.

“It was a team effort of 40 doctors, 20 nurses and many other medical staff. Without their help, all this would not have been possible,” the All India Institute of Medical Science said in a statement.

One of the surgeons involved in the operation told the BBC that one of the main difficulties was to fill the gaps in the brains left bare by the separation.

“The skin was generated by the expansion of two balloons that had been placed inside their head during the first operation in August,” said plastic surgeon Maneesh Singhal.

“The next step will be the reconstruction of the skulls,” he added.

Half of Siamese twins are stillborn, and for the others the survival rate is between 5 and 25%, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center website.

This malformation occurs when two twins are from the same egg, but their separation did not occur completely in the uterus.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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