Hero Cop Losing His Job Six Months Short Of Pension

Share

A police officer deemed a hero for his actions during the Pulse nightclub massacre is losing his job.

According to officer Omar Delgado, 45, a corporal at the Eatonville Police Department, he has been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder since the fateful night, June 12 when a gunman opened up inside the club, killing 49 people.

Delgado was one of the first officers on the scene, and helped many people get to safety. His bravery has drawn national attention due to his efforts that night.

“He was my hero. He saved my life and for them to just do what they’re doing to him in front of my face is a slap to my face as well,” a survivor helpd by Delgado told a local ABC affiliate. “He did his job that night on June 12 so they should have his back 100 percent totally and just be there for whatever he needs.”

Delgado, who makes just over $38,000 a year to put his life in danger every day is only six months away from qualifying for his pension, and there has been no public reason given as to why he is being let go.

He has been mainly on desk duty since the night club shootings, having tried to come back to work in his full capacity but having trouble with loud noises that bring back flashbacks of that night.

Delgado is very disappointed with the decision to let him go, saying: “It’s a small town and we’re like a family,” the officer said. “You don’t just throw a family member to the street. They’re acting like a Fortune 500 company and saying since you can’t do your job, we’re going to replace you. Even if the world saw me as a hero, that was yesterday.”

Delgado stated that he has asked his superiors to keep him on for an additional six months so he will qualify for his pension, but says that he was told he has to go because he can not do his job properly.

mm

Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


Share

Recommended For You