Scientists: Chocolate Extinct by 2050 Real Possibility

Share

Scientists say chocolate could be extinct by 2050

If you are to believe everything you hear, and are fond of the sweet stuff, then today will not be a very good day for you as scientists have just come out and stated that by the year of 2050, chocolate could be a thing of the past.

This shocking news comes following research conducted by scientists working at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration who claim that climate change is causing cacao plants to die off.

Cacao plants are a vital component when it comes to the making of chocolate, so if they die off, so will the main ingredient that goes into the creation of chocolate, making for many, many very sad people, myself included.

The thing with the cacao plant, is that it can not be grown just anywhere. If it could, it would probably be the most popular type of plant in the world!

Cacao plants are picky growers

Cacao plants grow best in very warm climates, within about 20° north and south of the equator—south of the Mediterranean home of carob. To thrive they require high humidity, rain, fairly good protection from rain and nitrogen-rich soil.

When you think about it you would think that a warm climate would be counter intuitive when it comes to chocolate as warm temperatures melt chocolate, but when it comes to the success of the cacao plant, they need warmth as part of their environment.

As global warming continues to impact the world going forward, the cacao plants will lose a key contributing factor to their successful growth, that being the appropriate temperature, which is why they will start to die off.

There does however appear to be a glimmer of hope for all chocolate lovers around the world, as scientists at the University of California Berkeley have teamed up with the Mars company in an attempt to save the cacao plant from possible extinction.

Using gene therapy, the scientists plan to modify the DNA of cacao seeds in the labratory, thus creating a new genetically developed version of the plant that would not require such finite growing conditions.

When you consider what scientists are able to do with gene therapy in other, uh, more important fields of our human existance, it is a fairly safe assumption to make that they will come up with some sort of remedy for the pending chocolate disaster we are facing.

mm

Jasmine holds a Master’s in Journalism from Ryerson University in Toronto and writes professionally in a broad variety of genres. She has worked as a senior manager in public relations and communications for major telecommunication companies, and is the former Deputy Director for Media Relations with the Modern Coalition. Jasmine writes primarily in our LGBTTQQIAAP section.


Share

Recommended For You

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *