NASA Says Canadian Hole In Ozone Layer Is Shrinking

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The giant hole in the earth’s protective ozone layer is apparently shrinking, according to a new report released by NASA on Thursday.

The ozone layer, which is such a vital protector of earth, is located between 12 to 19 miles above earth and prevents ultraviolet light from reaching the earth’s surface, which in turn lowers our risk of sunburn and skin cancer.

The massive hole above Antarctica, measures 1.3 million square miles less than last year and according to Paul Newman, chief Earth scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center this is directly due to stormy conditions that warmed the air and prevented chemicals from eating away at the ozone layer.

While it is true that warm air had a contributing factor in the reduction of the hole, if we were to experience a cooler year in 2018, the hole would actually expand.

Despite the shrinkage in the size of the hole, the hole over the Antarctic is still twice as big as the one over the United States.

“Weather conditions over Antarctica were a bit weaker and led to warmer temperatures, which slowed down ozone loss,” Newman said.

Back in 2000, the hole measured a staggering 11.5 million square miles, the biggest it has ever been since its discovery back in the late 80’s.

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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