Circus Tiger Shot And Killed In Paris

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Animal advocates are up in arms this morning following the shooting of a tiger who escaped its enclosure in Paris.

 

The 200 kilo cat was shot and killed by its owner, Eric Bormann, who says he raised her from birth and believes that somebody cut the lock to her cage, thus allowing her to escape.

 

“We suspect a malicious act,” said Bormann. “There was a chain with a padlock, and the chain was cut.”

 

He added: “I’m the one who takes care of my tigers. There is a whole security protocol to respect with big cats. If an animal escapes … it remains locked. It is a cage within a cage.”

 

While she was free, Mevy, did not harm anybody and was simply roaming around the streets.

 

One witness told BFMTV: “I saw a tiger running and heard three shots. The tiger was lying on the ground and there was blood.”

 

Police released a statement that read that the animal, who had been loose in Paris for quite some time was “neutralized” by a staff member from the circus near a bridge over the River Seine.

 

The animal belonged to the Bormann-Moreno circus which is set to open in Paris next week.

 

“We are devastated,” the circus said on its Facebook page. “The love of animals is the heart of our profession.”

 

The Brigitte Bardot Foundation whose mission it is to advocate on behalf of animals released the following statement:

 

“It’s a miracle that there weren’t any human victims this time,” the

 

“We must react immediately and ban this exploitation of wild animals reduced to slavery.”

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Brad is a former Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, is an award-winning travel, culture, and parenting writer. His writing has appeared in many of the Canada’s most respected and credible publications, including the Toronto Star, CBC News and on the cover of Smithsonian Magazine. A meticulous researcher who’s not afraid to be controversial, he is nationally known as a journalist who opens people’s eyes to the realities behind accepted practices in the care of children. Brad is a contributing journalist to Advocator.ca


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